Nanna Abell, Julie Falk, Marie Søndergaard Lolk, Asta Lynge, Daido Moriyama, Sara Sjölin, Gianna Surangkanjanajai, Rosemarie Trockel

Calamity

08 Oct – 13 Nov 2021

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Calamity, 2021

Installation view

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Calamity, 2021

Installation view

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Calamity, 2021

Installation view

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Calamity, 2021

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Calamity, 2021

Installation view

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Rika djur, 2018-2021

Sara Sjölin, video installation

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Calamity, 2021

Installation view

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Calamity, 2021

Installation view

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Calamity, 2021

Installation view

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Calamity, 2021

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Calamity, 2021

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Calamity, 2021

Installation view

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We are everywhere, 2021

Julie Falk, cardbord boxes, fiberglass, galvanized steel, 62 x 94 x 128 cm

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Marie Søndergaard Lolk, Untitled, 2021

Acrylic, non-wowen textile, foamboard, 140 x 100 cm

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Teletubby, 2021

Gianna Surangkanjanajai, cardboard, tape, mirror, 169 x 82 x 15 cm

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Ei, 1990

Rosemarie Trockel, bronze, 20 x 30 cm

Calamity
8 October – 13 November 2021

The exhibition brings together works by Nanna Abell, Julie Falk, Marie Søndergaard Lolk, Asta Lynge, Daido Moriyama, Sara Sjölin, Gianna Surangkanjanajai and Rosemarie Trockel. The title “Calamity”, which is translated as a disastrous event causing great and sudden damage, is taken from a semi-mythical female cowboy Martha Jane Cannery aka Calamity Jane, whom some may know from Lucky Luke comic books. She was an explorer, army scout, pioneer, storyteller, sharpshooter, performer, dance-hall girl, alleged sex worker. Calamity Jane seems to have worn this bombastic word as a piece of jewellery in late 1800. Taken in the context of the exhibition her figure functions as a fictional melting point and proxy for the constellation of the works exhibited.

During the past year, a year deeply inflicted with the pandemic, the exhibition has taken shape through a strong collaborative effort. Some of the works were newly made; others carefully looked for. Besides a genuine appreciation of the artists, the urge to bring them together was, vaguely: Explosiveness and nothingness. A strong refusal to be mediated. As the show has taken shape, it turns out to be something euphorically different from what we were even able to anticipate. Streetlights, cornfields, rings and cats. Dizziness. An eye, an egg, a face. A camera, a lens, a big city as fabric. Somewhat greasy and black, but most of all, it is perhaps a sense of obscurity of being in the world, that is presented here by the artists in form of video, photography, painting and sculpture.

(Martha Jane Cannery was functionally illiterate. The promotional pamphlet she dictated spelled her surname “Cannary” (with two N’s) and repeatedly misspelled “Missourri”. It also got her birth date wrong, making her about six years too old. There is ample evidence that her surname was probably spelled with only one N, including the census report of her parents when she was 4 years old. It is also questioned whether she received her middle name Jane at birth or sometime later)